GENERAL INFORMATION FOR NTSB REPORT: ANC00FA076
Data Source NTSB AVIATION ACCIDENT/INCIDENT DATABASE
NTSB Report Nbr ANC00FA076
Event Id 20001212X21133
Local Date 06/22/2000
Local Time 1845
State AK
Airport Name TUNTUTULIAK
Event Type ACCIDENT
Injury Severity FATAL
Record Status
Mid Air Collision NO
Event Location ON AIRPORT/AIRSTRIP

WEATHER INFORMATION
Weather Briefing Complete UNKNOWN
Basic Weather Conditions VISUAL METEOROLOGICAL COND
Light Condition DAY
Cloud Condition SCATTERED
Cloud Height above Ground Level (ft) 8000
Ceiling Height above Ground Level (ft) 0
Cloud Type NONE
Visibility RVR (ft) 0
Visibility RVV (sm) 0
Visibility (sm) 10
Wind Direction (deg) 340
Wind Condition Flag U
Wind Speed (knots) 15
Wind Condition Indicated Unknown

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION
Aircraft 1
Type of Operation PART 91: GENERAL AVIATION
Registration Number N4762D
Aircraft Make CESSNA
Aircraft Model 172
Aircraft Series N
Aircraft Damage DESTROYED
Aircraft Fire NONE
Aircraft Explosion NONE
Aircraft Type AIRPLANE
Aircraft Homebuilt UNKNOWN
Phase of Flight UNDEFINED
Aircraft Use POSITIONING
Flight Plan Filed COMPANY VFR
Operator Name VILLAGE AVIATION INC
Operator Doing Business As CAMAI AIR
Owner Name VILLAGE AVIATION, INC.
Number of Seats 4
Number of Engines 1
ELT Installed YES
ELT Operated NO
Departure Airport Id AK61
Departure City
Last Departure Point YES
Destination Airport Id PABE
Destination City BETHEL
Destination State ALASKA
Runway Id 20
Runway Length 1800
Runway Width 28
Air Carrier Operating Certificates YES
Air Carrier Other Operating Certificates UNKNOWN
Rotocraft/Agriculture Operating Certificate UNKNOWN
Cert Max Gross Wgt 2400

ENGINE INFORMATION

Aircraft 1 - Engine : #1
Engine Manufactuer Lycoming
Engine Model O-320-E2D
Engine Horsepower 180
Engine Thrust HP
Carb/Injection CARBURETOR

INJURY INFORMATION
Injury Summary for Aircraft 1
Fatal Serious Minor None
Crew 0 0 0 0
Pass 0 0 0 0
Total 1 1 0 0
Sequence of Events for Aircraft 1
Occurrence #1
IN FLIGHT ENCOUNTER WITH WEATHER
Phase of Operation: TAKEOFF - INITIAL CLIMB

Events Sequence for Occurrence #1 of Aircraft 1
Event Seq # Event Group Code Subject Modifier Personnel Cause/Factor
1 1 WEATHER CONDITION TAILWIND FACTOR
2 1 WEATHER CONDITION GUSTS FACTOR
3 2 WIND INFORMATION DISREGARDED PILOT IN COMMAND CAUSE

Occurrence #2
LOSS OF CONTROL - IN FLIGHT
Phase of Operation: TAKEOFF - INITIAL CLIMB

Events Sequence for Occurrence #2 of Aircraft 1
Event Seq # Event Group Code Subject Modifier Personnel Cause/Factor
4 2 STALL/SPIN INADVERTENT PILOT IN COMMAND CAUSE

Occurrence #3
IN FLIGHT COLLISION WITH TERRAIN/WATER
Phase of Operation: DESCENT - UNCONTROLLED

Events Sequence for Occurrence #3 of Aircraft 1
Event Seq # Event Group Code Subject Modifier Personnel Cause/Factor
5 1 TERRAIN CONDITION SWAMPY
6 1 TERRAIN CONDITION TUNDRA




AIRCRAFT 1 PRELIMINARY REPORT


HISTORY OF FLIGHT On June 22, 2000, about 1845 Alaska daylight time, a Cessna 172N airplane, N4762D, was destroyed when it collided with level terrain immediately after takeoff from the Tuntutuliak Airport, Tuntutuliak, Alaska. The commercial pilot was fatally injured, and the one passenger on board received serious injuries. The flight was conducted under 14 CFR Part 91, as a repositioning flight to Bethel, Alaska, after the completion of a 14 CFR Part 135 charter. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed at the time of the accident, and a company VFR flight plan was filed. Five witnesses interviewed at the accident site on June 23, told the NTSB investigator-in-charge (IIC) the winds were from about 340 degrees magnetic at 15 knots, gusting to 30 knots. The witnesses said the airplane landed on runway 02 and dropped off two passengers. The pilot and remaining passenger, who was a company employee, then departed on runway 20, with a tailwind from the right. They all described the airplane lifting off the ground by the pond where they were swimming (about 200 feet from the departure end), turning left, and dropping sharply to the ground. INJURIES TO PERSONS The pilot received fatal injuries. The passenger, seated in the right front seat, received serious facial, torso, and lower leg injuries. DAMAGE TO AIRCRAFT The airplane was destroyed by impact forces. PERSONNEL INFORMATION The pilot held a commercial pilot certificate with ratings for multiengine land, single engine land, and single engine sea airplanes. He held an instrument rating. His second-class medical certificate, issued on September 7, 1999, contained no restrictions. According to the pilot's logbook, he had accumulated 1,625 hours of total flight experience at the time of the accident. Approximately 600 hours were in the Cessna 172. In the previous 90 days, the pilot had flown about 100 hours. In the previous 30 days, he had flown about 30 hours. On the day of the accident he had flown about 6 hours. His most recent biennial flight review, and 14 CFR 135.293/299 checks, were conducted on February 18, in a Cessna 207 airplane. He completed 14 CFR 135.293 oral checks on the Cessna 172 on March 7, 2000. Both passengers who were dropped off on the inbound flight to Tuntutuliak said the pilot was happy and talking with them during their flight. The passenger told the NTSB IIC that the pilot was in a good mood. AIRCRAFT INFORMATION The airplane was a 1979 Cessna 172N, equipped with a Textron Lycoming O-320-E2D engine, rated at 180 shaft horsepower. The engine was configured with a McCauley 1C160/DTM7553 propeller. The engine was installed during the most recent annual inspection on June 12, 2000, at 3,553 airframe hours, 31 hours prior to the accident. At the time of installation the engine had accumulated 2,100 hours since new, and 0 hours since major overhaul. A 25-hour engine inspection and oil change was performed 6 hours prior to the accident, with no anomalies noted. The airplane was equipped with a Robertson Short Take Off and Landing (STOL) kit. METEOROLOGICAL INFORMATION Witnesses described the weather as scattered clouds, with winds from 340 degrees magnetic at 15 knots, gusting to 30 knots. AERODROME INFORMATION The airport elevation is 16 feet above mean sea level. The 1,800 feet long by 28 feet wide gravel runway is oriented 200 degrees magnetic, and was dry at the time of the accident. There is a shed and windsock located at the north end of the runway. WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION The NTSB IIC, and an FAA operations inspector, commenced the on-site investigation on June 23. The airplane came to rest in an upright position, 204 feet east of the departure end of runway 20, with the nose pointed 020 degrees magnetic. The terrain consisted of flat, level tundra, covered with light brush and willows. No vegetation surrounding the wreckage was disturbed, except for the immediate footprint of the airplane. Several two-inch thick willow branches were cleanly cut, and found on top and in front of the airplane. Both wings were broken directly downward at the wing root attachments. The tail and empennage assembly was broken about 30 degrees downward at station 90. The engine was displaced downward from the firewall about 15 degrees. The trailing edge flaps were found in the retracted position. The trailing edge flaps control handle was in the full down position. The flap indicator was in the 1/3 down position. Fuel was observed in both wing tanks, in the fuel lines leading to the carburetor, and in the carburetor bowl. No indication of water or contaminants was observed in the fuel. The wreckage was recovered by the owner and placed in storage. On July 19, the NTSB IIC inspected the wreckage and engine assembly. Both propeller blades were twisted, and the propeller spinner was torn torsionally. All engine accessories were removed and inspected. No preaccident anomalies were noted with the powerplant, accessories, or airplane. MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION The Alaska State Medical Examiner, 5700 East Tudor Avenue, Anchorage, Alaska, performed a postmortem examination on June 26, 2000. The cause of death was noted to be multiple blunt impact injuries. Toxicological samples were tested at the FAA Civil Aeromedical Institute, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, on July 21, 2000. No drugs or alcohol were noted. SURVIVAL ASPECTS Both occupants received facial, torso, and lower extremity injuries. The village public safety officer, and numerous volunteers, arrived on scene within five minutes. The passenger was extracted from the wreckage, first aid was administered, and he was transported to the hospital in Bethel within one hour. He was medically stabilized, and further transported via air ambulance to Anchorage. Both occupants were wearing shoulder harnesses and lap belts at the time of the accident. TESTS AND RESEARCH The trailing edge flap actuator crossover cable was found separated. Inspection of the failed area by NTSB materials laboratory technicians on July 6, 2000, revealed features typical of overstress, and no evidence of fatigue or wear. ADDITIONAL DATA/INFORMATION Company Information At the time of the accident, the company operated a fleet of seven airplanes consisting of four Cessna 207s, two Cessna 172s, and one Cessna 206. The company's principal base was Bethel. The company operated both scheduled commuter, and on-demand air taxi flights, serving southwestern Alaska. Retained wreckage, aircraft and pilot logbooks, and the Pilot's Operating Handbook were returned to the owner on June 26, June 28, July 17, and August 14, 2000. Photographs developed from the pilot's camera were returned to the operator on July 28, 2000.

AIRCRAFT 1 FINAL REPORT


The pilot departed the 1,800 feet long by 28 feet wide gravel runway with a tailwind from the right of 15 knots, gusting to 30 knots. The airport was equipped with an operable windsock. The passenger did not describe, nor did postaccident inspection reveal, any preaccident anomalies with the airplane, powerplant, or accessories. Witnesses said the airplane lifted off the ground about 200 feet from the departure end, turned left, and dropped sharply to the ground. No vegetation surrounding the wreckage was disturbed, except for the immediate footprint of the airplane.

AIRCRAFT 1 CAUSE REPORT


The pilot's disregard of the existing wind conditions, and an inadvertent stall. Factors associated with the accident are a tailwind, and wind gusts.


END REPORT