GENERAL INFORMATION FOR NTSB REPORT: ANC00FA128
Data Source NTSB AVIATION ACCIDENT/INCIDENT DATABASE
NTSB Report Nbr ANC00FA128
Event Id 20001212X21881
Local Date 09/20/2000
Local Time 615
State AK
City ANIAK
Airport Name FORTY SEVEN MILE CREEK
Event Type ACCIDENT
Injury Severity FATAL
Record Status
Mid Air Collision NO
Event Location OFF AIRPORT/AIRSTRIP

WEATHER INFORMATION
Weather Briefing Complete UNKNOWN
Light Condition NOT REPORTED
Cloud Condition UNKNOWN
Ceiling Height above Ground Level (ft) 500
Cloud Type OVERCAST

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION
Aircraft 1
Type of Operation PART 135: AIR TAXI & COMMUTER
Registration Number N42472
Aircraft Make CESSNA
Aircraft Model 207
Aircraft Series UNDESIGNATED SERIES
Aircraft Damage DESTROYED
Aircraft Fire NONE
Aircraft Explosion NONE
Aircraft Type AIRPLANE
Aircraft Homebuilt UNKNOWN
Phase of Flight CLIMB
Aircraft Use UNKNOWN
Category of Operation NON-SCHEDULED
Flight Plan Filed NONE
Domestic/International DOMESTIC
Passenger/Cargo CARGO
Operator Name INLAND AVIATION SERVICES INC
Operator Doing Business As INLAND AVIATION SERVICES
Owner Name INLAND HOLDINGS, INC.
Number of Seats 2
Number of Engines 1
ELT Installed YES
ELT Operated YES
Departure City 47 MILE CREEK
Departure State ALASKA
Last Departure Point NO
Destination Local CRASH AT DESTINATION CITY
Destination Airport Id ANI
Destination City Aniak
Destination State ALASKA
Runway Id 09
Runway Length 3000
Runway Width 50
Air Carrier Operating Certificates UNKNOWN
Air Carrier Other Operating Certificates UNKNOWN
Cert Max Gross Wgt 3800

ENGINE INFORMATION

Aircraft 1 - Engine : #1
Engine Manufactuer Continental
Engine Model IO-520
Engine Horsepower 300
Engine Thrust HP
Carb/Injection FUEL INJECTED
Propeller Type CONTROLLABLE PITCH

INJURY INFORMATION
Injury Summary for Aircraft 1
Fatal Serious Minor None
Crew 0 0 0 0
Pass 0 0 0 0
Total 1 0 0 0
Sequence of Events for Aircraft 1
Occurrence #1
IN FLIGHT COLLISION WITH TERRAIN/WATER
Phase of Operation: CLIMB

Events Sequence for Occurrence #1 of Aircraft 1
Event Seq # Event Group Code Subject Modifier Personnel Cause/Factor
1 1 LIGHT CONDITION DARK NIGHT FACTOR
2 1 WEATHER CONDITION LOW CEILING FACTOR
2 2 VFR FLIGHT INTO IMC INITIATED PILOT IN COMMAND CAUSE
2 3 SELF-INDUCED PRESSURE PILOT IN COMMAND FACTOR
3 2 PROCEDURES/DIRECTIVES NOT FOLLOWED PILOT IN COMMAND FACTOR




AIRCRAFT 1 PRELIMINARY REPORT


HISTORY OF FLIGHT On September 20, 2000, about 0615 Alaska daylight time, a Cessna 207 airplane, N42472, was destroyed when it collided with mountainous terrain after takeoff from the 47-Mile Creek airstrip, about 55 miles southeast of Aniak, Alaska, at 61 degrees 02.41 minutes north latitude, 158 degrees, 10.38 minutes west longitude. The airplane was being operated under 14 CFR, Part 135, as an on demand air taxi flight transporting game meat from a hunting lodge to Aniak. The pilot had flown from Aniak to 47-Mile Creek the day prior to the accident under 14 CFR Part 91 to hunt. His return flight was conducted under 14 CFR Part 135. The airplane was operated by Inland Aviation Services, of Aniak. The solo commercial pilot received fatal injuries. No flight plan was filed. WITNESSES According to the guide at the hunting lodge, the pilot flew to the airstrip on September 19 with his dog to hunt birds. He told the guide he would depart the next morning at 0600, as he needed to be in Aniak by 0700 for a 0800 air taxi flight for his employer. The guide and the pilot awakened about 0500; the guide made coffee, and then went back to bed. He heard the pilot start the airplane about 0600, and takeoff about 0608. He said he heard the accident airplane's engine power being reduced about 0615, followed by an immediate impact. The guide said he stepped out of his cabin to look for the airplane, but it was too dark to see anything. He went to his personal airplane, and attempted to radio the Kenai FAA Flight Service Station about the accident. He was unable to reach them from the ground, and elected to try and contact them while airborne. After liftoff, he said he immediately entered the clouds, and had to descend and return to land. He did make an airborne radio transmission about the accident, but was unsure if his transmission was received. The guide estimated the overcast cloud cover was about 500 feet above the 1,040 feet msl airstrip. According to an Alaska State Trooper who interviewed the guide, the guide believed the pilot was returning to land because of the low clouds and bad weather. The guide and three of the hunters in camp later reached the accident site about 1015, after the clouds had lifted. The pilot had been ejected from the airplane, and was deceased. METEROLOGICAL INFORMATION The accident occurred during the hours of darkness in instrument meteorological conditions. Sunrise at the accident location on the morning of the accident was 0813; civil twilight was 0730. The accident occurred about 0615. Federal air regulations prohibit visual flight rules (VFR) fixed-wing single-engine air taxi flights from operating at unlighted airfields prior to morning civil twilight. Minimum en route VFR air taxi weather rules in uncontrolled airspace requires 500 feet clearance above the ground, 2 miles visibility, and standard cloud separation. WRECKAGE AND IMPACT INFORMATION The on-site investigation began on September 21. Present was the NTSB investigator-in-charge, and a Cessna Aircraft accident investigator who was designated a party to the investigation. The wreckage was located at 2,060 feet msl, about 300 feet below a ridge, one mile southwest of the west end of the departure airstrip. The energy path of the wreckage was distributed on a track of 190 degrees magnetic. About 1,200 pounds of game meat and animal horns were at the crash site, which was consistent with information supplied by the guide witness. Approximately 14 gallons of fuel was confirmed by the NTSB IIC to be in each wing tank. All major components of the airplane were at the accident site, and there was no evidence of fire. Flight control continuity was established from the respective flight controls to the forward cabin area. Continuity to each flight control actuator was not possible due to impact damage and fuselage crush. The flap selector was selected "up," the throttle and mixture selectors were all the way forward (full on and full rich). The engine was separated from its engine mounts. The three bladed engine propeller had separated from the engine at the crankshaft face flange. The propeller had numerous chordwise scratches and gouges, and "S" type bending. No evidence of any preimpact mechanical anomaly was discovered with either the airframe or engine. MEDICAL AND PATHOLOGICAL INFORMATION An autopsy was performed on September 22, by the Alaska State Medical Examiner's Office, 5700 East Tudor Road, Anchorage, Alaska. The autopsy report indicated there was no evidence of significant natural disease. The cause of death was listed as multiple blunt impact injuries associated with an airplane accident. Toxicological samples were sent to the FAA's Civil Aero Medical Institute for testing. The test results were negative for alcohol and basic drugs. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION No NTSB supplemental report forms were completed for this accident report.

AIRCRAFT 1 FINAL REPORT


The air taxi pilot had flown to a remote airstrip and lodge in a company airplane to go hunting. He was scheduled the next morning for a flight from his company's base of operations, his original departure airport. According to a hunting guide at the lodge, the pilot departed the lodge's airstrip about 0608, with a load of revenue cargo. A few minutes later, the guide heard the sound of an airplane, and then a loud impact. The guide could not see the wreckage because it was too dark outside. He departed in his own airplane, but entered clouds shortly after takeoff, and had to return. The guide commented he thought the accident pilot was trying to return to the lodge airstrip because of the poor weather and darkness. The wreckage was located on a nearby mountain in daylight hours after the cloud cover had dissipated. Postaccident inspection disclosed no evidence of any preimpact mechanical anomalies with the airplane. Official sunrise was 0813; official civil twilight was 0730. The time of the accident was approximately 0615.

AIRCRAFT 1 CAUSE REPORT


The pilot's decision to initiate visual flight into dark night instrument meteorological conditions. Factors associated with the accident are a low ceiling, a dark night, the pilot's failure to follow regulatory procedures and directives, and his self-induced pressure to return to base to take another flight.


END REPORT