GENERAL INFORMATION FOR NTSB REPORT: ANC00LA021
Data Source NTSB AVIATION ACCIDENT/INCIDENT DATABASE
NTSB Report Nbr ANC00LA021
Event Id 20001212X20189
Local Date 12/24/1999
Local Time 1045
State AK
Airport Name BETHEL
Event Type ACCIDENT
Injury Severity MINOR
Record Status
Mid Air Collision NO
Event Location ON AIRPORT/AIRSTRIP

WEATHER INFORMATION
Weather Briefing Complete FULL
Basic Weather Conditions VISUAL METEOROLOGICAL COND
Light Condition DAY
Cloud Condition SCATTERED
Cloud Height above Ground Level (ft) 100
Ceiling Height above Ground Level (ft) 0
Cloud Type UNKNOWN
Visibility RVR (ft) 0
Visibility RVV (sm) 0
Visibility (sm) 6
Wind Direction (deg) 20
Wind Condition Flag U
Wind Speed (knots) 6
Wind Condition Indicated Unknown

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION
Aircraft 1
Type of Operation PART 135: AIR TAXI & COMMUTER
Registration Number N1864
Aircraft Make CESSNA
Aircraft Model T207
Aircraft Series A
Aircraft Damage SUBSTANTIAL
Aircraft Fire NONE
Aircraft Explosion NONE
Aircraft Type AIRPLANE
Aircraft Homebuilt UNKNOWN
Phase of Flight TAKEOFF
Aircraft Use UNKNOWN
Category of Operation SCHEDULED
Flight Plan Filed COMPANY VFR
Domestic/International DOMESTIC
Passenger/Cargo PASSENGER ONLY
Operator Name GRANT AVIATION INC
Operator Doing Business As
Owner Name GRANT AVIATION, INC.
Number of Seats 6
Number of Engines 1
ELT Installed YES
ELT Operated YES
Departure Airport Id
Departure City
Last Departure Point YES
Destination Airport Id CFK
Destination City CHEFORNAK
Destination State ALASKA
Runway Id 18
Runway Length 6398
Runway Width 150
Air Carrier Operating Certificates YES
Air Carrier Other Operating Certificates UNKNOWN
Rotocraft/Agriculture Operating Certificate UNKNOWN
Cert Max Gross Wgt 3800

ENGINE INFORMATION

Aircraft 1 - Engine : #1
Engine Manufactuer Continental
Engine Model IO-520-F
Engine Horsepower 300
Engine Thrust HP
Carb/Injection FUEL INJECTED

INJURY INFORMATION
Injury Summary for Aircraft 1
Fatal Serious Minor None
Crew 0 0 0 0
Pass 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 1 5
Sequence of Events for Aircraft 1
Occurrence #1
LOSS OF CONTROL - IN FLIGHT
Phase of Operation: TAKEOFF - INITIAL CLIMB

Events Sequence for Occurrence #1 of Aircraft 1
Event Seq # Event Group Code Subject Modifier Personnel Cause/Factor
1 2 ICE/FROST REMOVAL FROM AIRCRAFT NOT PERFORMED PILOT IN COMMAND CAUSE
2 2 STALL/MUSH INADVERTENT PILOT IN COMMAND CAUSE

Occurrence #2
IN FLIGHT COLLISION WITH TERRAIN/WATER
Phase of Operation: EMERGENCY LANDING AFTER TAKEOFF

Events Sequence for Occurrence #2 of Aircraft 1
Event Seq # Event Group Code Subject Modifier Personnel Cause/Factor




AIRCRAFT 1 PRELIMINARY REPORT


On December 24, 1999, about 1045 Alaska standard time, a wheel equipped Cessna T207A airplane, N1864, sustained substantial damage after colliding with snow-covered terrain during takeoff from the Bethel Airport, Bethel, Alaska. The flight was being conducted under Title 14, CFR Part 135, as a scheduled commuter flight, operated by Grant Aviation, Inc., as Flight 281. The certificated commercial pilot sustained minor injuries, and the five passengers aboard were not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed, and company visual flight rules (VFR) flight following procedures were in effect for the flight to Chefornak, Alaska. During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge on December 24, the pilot reported that he did a preflight inspection of the accident airplane in anticipation of a 0900 departure time. He said that during the preflight inspection, he removed an accumulation of frost from the wings, and horizontal stabilizer. After completing the preflight inspection, the original departure time was delayed due to ice fog, and low visibility. He said that about 2 hours later the weather appeared to be improving, so he elected to load his passengers on board the airplane, anticipating that weather conditions would improve soon. The accident pilot reported that while taxiing to the active runway, weather conditions were still below basic VFR conditions, with fog and low visibility. He said that as the accident airplane neared the active runway, the Bethel Air Traffic Control Tower (ATCT) reported that weather conditions had improved, and that the Bethel Airport was now operating under VFR conditions. The accident airplane was then issued a takeoff clearance for runway 18, at intersection golf. The accident pilot stated while departing runway 18, about 20 feet above the runway, the engine surged followed by a loss of power. He said that emergency engine procedures did not restore power. The airplane collided with snow-covered terrain during an off-airport emergency landing, and sustained substantial damage to the fuselage and wings. On December 25, company and insurance personnel retrieved the airplane from the accident site, and transported it to the operator's hangar at the Bethel Airport. On December 28, a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) airworthiness inspector, Anchorage Flight Standards District Office, traveled to Bethel, and examined the airplane at the operator's facility. He reported there were no engine or airframe mechanical anomalies revealed during the inspection. The FAA inspector said that he was present when the engine was started and operated while still attached to the accident airplane. He added that the engine was only operated at idle speed due to substantial airframe damage. The engine was removed from the accident airplane and transported to Anchorage, Alaska. On January 13, 2000, with the National Transportation Safety Board investigator-in-charge present, the engine was operated on an engine test stand. The engine produced full rated power. A pilot-rated Alaska State Trooper, with extensive experience in the accident airplane make and model, examined the airplane following the rescue of the pilot and passengers. He reported that during his inspection he discovered that the wings, horizontal stabilizer, and elevators had an accumulation of frost. The closest weather observation station is Bethel. On December 24, at 1053, an Aviation Routine Weather Report (METAR) was reporting in part: Sky conditions and ceiling, 100 feet scattered; visibility, 6 statute miles; wind, 020 degrees at 6 knots; temperature, minus 23 degrees F; dew point, minus 27 degrees F; altimeter, 29.87; remarks, patches of fog.

AIRCRAFT 1 FINAL REPORT


The certificated commercial pilot, with five passengers aboard, was departing runway 18 on a scheduled commuter flight. The pilot stated that the flight's original departure time was delayed for two hours due to ice fog, and low visibility. He said that just after takeoff, the engine surged followed by a loss of power. The airplane collided with snow-covered terrain during an off-airport emergency landing, and sustained substantial damage to the propeller, fuselage, and wings. Following retrieval of the airplane, an FAA airworthiness inspector examined the airplane, and found no mechanical anomalies. While still attached to the airplane, the engine was started and run at idle. The engine later produced full power on an engine test stand. A pilot-rated Alaska State Trooper, with extensive experience in the accident airplane make and model, examined the airplane soon after the accident. He said the wings, horizontal stabilizer, and elevators had an accumulation of frost.

AIRCRAFT 1 CAUSE REPORT


The pilot's failure to remove frost from the airplane prior to flight, and an inadvertent stall/mush.


END REPORT