GENERAL INFORMATION FOR NTSB REPORT: ANC00LA060
Data Source NTSB AVIATION ACCIDENT/INCIDENT DATABASE
NTSB Report Nbr ANC00LA060
Event Id 20001212X20937
Local Date 05/19/2000
Local Time 1200
State AK
Airport Name ANDERSON LAKE STRIP
Event Type ACCIDENT
Injury Severity MINOR
Record Status
Mid Air Collision NO
Event Location ON AIRPORT/AIRSTRIP

WEATHER INFORMATION
Weather Briefing Complete UNKNOWN
Basic Weather Conditions VISUAL METEOROLOGICAL COND
Light Condition DAY
Cloud Condition UNKNOWN
Cloud Height above Ground Level (ft) 0
Ceiling Height above Ground Level (ft) 2900
Cloud Type BROKEN
Visibility RVR (ft) 0
Visibility RVV (sm) 0
Visibility (sm) 10
Wind Direction (deg) 216
Wind Condition Flag U
Wind Speed (knots) 4
Wind Condition Indicated Unknown

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION
Aircraft 1
Type of Operation PART 91: GENERAL AVIATION
Registration Number N49EB
Aircraft Make PIPER
Aircraft Model PA12
Aircraft Series NO SERIES EXISTS
Aircraft Damage SUBSTANTIAL
Aircraft Fire NONE
Aircraft Explosion NONE
Aircraft Type AIRPLANE
Aircraft Homebuilt UNKNOWN
Phase of Flight UNDEFINED
Aircraft Use PERSONAL
Flight Plan Filed NONE
Operator Name BENJAMIN P. HANCOCK
Operator Doing Business As
Owner Name LARRY HANCOCK
Number of Seats 3
Number of Engines 1
ELT Installed UNKNOWN
ELT Operated UNKNOWN
Departure Airport Id 0AK1
Departure City
Last Departure Point YES
Destination Airport Id PACV
Destination City CORDOVA
Destination State ALASKA
Runway Id 8
Runway Length 2200
Runway Width 60
Air Carrier Operating Certificates NO
Air Carrier Other Operating Certificates UNKNOWN
Rotocraft/Agriculture Operating Certificate UNKNOWN
Cert Max Gross Wgt 1750

ENGINE INFORMATION

Aircraft 1 - Engine : #1
Engine Manufactuer Lycoming
Engine Model O-320
Engine Horsepower 150
Engine Thrust HP
Carb/Injection CARBURETOR

INJURY INFORMATION
Injury Summary for Aircraft 1
Fatal Serious Minor None
Crew 0 0 0 0
Pass 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 2 1
Sequence of Events for Aircraft 1
Occurrence #1
IN FLIGHT ENCOUNTER WITH WEATHER
Phase of Operation: TAKEOFF - INITIAL CLIMB

Events Sequence for Occurrence #1 of Aircraft 1
Event Seq # Event Group Code Subject Modifier Personnel Cause/Factor
1 1 WEATHER CONDITION SUDDEN WINDSHIFT FACTOR
2 2 COMPENSATION FOR WIND CONDITIONS INADEQUATE PILOT IN COMMAND CAUSE

Occurrence #2
IN FLIGHT COLLISION WITH TERRAIN/WATER
Phase of Operation: TAKEOFF - ABORTED

Events Sequence for Occurrence #2 of Aircraft 1
Event Seq # Event Group Code Subject Modifier Personnel Cause/Factor
3 1 TERRAIN CONDITION RUNWAY




AIRCRAFT 1 PRELIMINARY REPORT


On May 19, 2000, about 1200 Alaska daylight time, a tundra tire equipped Piper PA-12 airplane, N49EB, sustained substantial damage during takeoff from the Anderson Lake Airstrip, a private airstrip about 4 miles north-northeast of Wasilla, Alaska. The airplane was being operated as a visual flight rules (VFR) personal flight, when the accident occurred. The airplane was operated by the pilot. The pilot, holder of a student pilot certificate, and one passenger, received minor injuries. The second passenger was not injured. Visual meteorological conditions prevailed. The president of the home owners association, where the airstrip is located, notified the Alaska State Trooper's office of the accident. During a telephone conversation with the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) investigator-in-charge (IIC) on May 19, the association's president stated that he did not see the accident. However, he was told by the pilot that during takeoff toward the east (runway 08), the accident airplane encountered a wind shear at tree top level, and crashed on the runway. An Alaska State Trooper responded to the accident scene. After verifying that there were no serious injuries, he obtained the names of the occupants of the airplane. During a telephone conversation with the NTSB IIC, the trooper reported that the pilot said he was planning to fly to Cordova, Alaska, to go hunting. The trooper said the pilot told him that the airplane's annual inspection was expired. When the trooper asked about his flight experience, the pilot reported he had accrued about 300 hours. A Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector, Anchorage Flight Standards District Office (FSDO), responded to the accident scene. When he arrived, the pilot, with others assisting, were disassembling the airplane. The inspector reported that the damage to the airplane consisted of wrinkling of both sides of the fuselage. In addition, the airplane had damage to the right wing lift strut, the main landing gear was folded upward under the airplane, and the propeller was bent. The inspector said that the pilot refused to talk with him about the accident. The NTSB IIC received a telephone call from the pilot on May 19. When asked about the details of the accident, the pilot refused to provide his name or any additional information. The NTSB Northwest Field Office sent a Pilot/Operator report (NTSB form 6120.1/2) to the pilot's address of record in Cordova. The form was returned unsigned, and noted the date of the accident was April 19, 2000. It contained an indication that the pilot held a private pilot certificate, and that he had accrued 81.3 hours. A review of FAA airmen records maintained at the FAA's Airmen Certification Branch, Oklahoma City, revealed the pilot was issued a private pilot certificate on May 25, 2000, six days after the accident. A FAA airworthiness inspector located the airplane wreckage and maintenance records in Eagle River, Alaska, on July 17, 2000. The maintenance records indicated the last annual inspection on the airframe and engine was April 3, 1997. The closest official weather observation station is Wasilla, Alaska, which is located 4 nautical miles southwest of the accident site. On May 19, 2000, at 1155, an automated weather observation system (AWOS) was reporting in part: Wind, 240 degrees (true) at 4 knots; visibility, 10 statute miles; clouds and sky condition, 2,900 feet broken, 4,200 feet overcast; temperature, 46 degrees F; dew point, 34 degrees F; altimeter, 29.79 inHg.

AIRCRAFT 1 FINAL REPORT


The pilot, holder of a student pilot certificate, was departing from a private airstrip with two passengers. A witness reported the airplane encountered a wind shear at tree top level, and crashed on the runway. An Alaska State Trooper responded to the accident scene and spoke with the pilot. The pilot told the trooper that he was planning to go hunting. The pilot said that he had accrued about 300 hours, and he also told the trooper that the airplane's annual inspection was expired. An FAA inspector responded to the accident scene. When he arrived, the pilot, with others assisting, were disassembling the airplane. The inspector reported that the damage to the airplane consisted of wrinkling of both sides of the fuselage. In addition, the airplane had damage to the right wing lift strut, the main landing gear was folded upward under the airplane, and the propeller was bent. The inspector said that the pilot refused to talk with him about the accident. The NTSB IIC received a telephone call from the pilot later the day of the accident. When asked about the details of the accident, the pilot refused to provide his name or any additional information. The NTSB Northwest Field Office received an NTSB Pilot/Operator report from the pilot's address of record. The form was unsigned, and indicated that after takeoff, the airplane lost lift when the wind direction changed at tree-top level. The takeoff was then aborted. FAA records indicate the pilot received a private pilot certificate six days after the accident.

AIRCRAFT 1 CAUSE REPORT


The pilot's inadequate compensation for wind conditions during takeoff. A factor in the accident was a sudden wind shift.


END REPORT