GENERAL INFORMATION FOR NTSB REPORT: ANC00LA073
Data Source NTSB AVIATION ACCIDENT/INCIDENT DATABASE
NTSB Report Nbr ANC00LA073
Event Id 20001212X21145
Local Date 06/21/2000
Local Time 1345
State AK
Event Type ACCIDENT
Injury Severity MINOR
Record Status
Mid Air Collision NO
Event Location OFF AIRPORT/AIRSTRIP

WEATHER INFORMATION
Weather Briefing Complete FULL
Basic Weather Conditions INSTRUMENT METEOROLOGICAL COND
Light Condition DAY
Cloud Condition UNKNOWN
Cloud Height above Ground Level (ft) 0
Ceiling Height above Ground Level (ft) 0
Cloud Type OBSCURED
Visibility RVR (ft) 0
Visibility RVV (sm) 0
Visibility (sm) 1
Wind Direction (deg) 280
Wind Condition Flag U
Wind Speed (knots) 7
Wind Condition Indicated Unknown

AIRCRAFT INFORMATION
Aircraft 1
Type of Operation PART 91: GENERAL AVIATION
Registration Number N2623B
Aircraft Make STODDARD HAMILTON
Aircraft Model GLASTAR
Aircraft Series NO SERIES EXISTS
Aircraft Damage DESTROYED
Aircraft Fire NONE
Aircraft Explosion NONE
Aircraft Type AIRPLANE
Aircraft Homebuilt UNKNOWN
Phase of Flight CRUISE
Aircraft Use PERSONAL
Flight Plan Filed VFR
Operator Name
Operator Doing Business As
Owner Name DONALD R. BLANC
Number of Engines 1
ELT Installed UNKNOWN
ELT Operated UNKNOWN
Departure Airport Id CYXQ
Departure City BEAVER CREEK
Departure State YUKON
Last Departure Point NO
Destination Local CRASH AT DESTINATION CITY
Destination Airport Id ORT
Destination City
Destination State ALASKA
Runway Id 0
Air Carrier Operating Certificates NO
Air Carrier Other Operating Certificates UNKNOWN
Rotocraft/Agriculture Operating Certificate UNKNOWN

ENGINE INFORMATION

Aircraft 1 - Engine : #1
Engine Manufactuer
Engine Model

INJURY INFORMATION
Injury Summary for Aircraft 1
Fatal Serious Minor None
Crew 0 0 0 0
Pass 0 0 0 0
Total 0 0 2 0
Sequence of Events for Aircraft 1
Occurrence #1
IN FLIGHT ENCOUNTER WITH WEATHER
Phase of Operation: CRUISE

Events Sequence for Occurrence #1 of Aircraft 1
Event Seq # Event Group Code Subject Modifier Personnel Cause/Factor
1 1 WEATHER CONDITION LOW CEILING FACTOR
2 2 FLIGHT INTO KNOWN ADVERSE WEATHER CONTINUED PILOT IN COMMAND CAUSE

Occurrence #2
IN FLIGHT COLLISION WITH OBJECT
Phase of Operation: MANEUVERING

Events Sequence for Occurrence #2 of Aircraft 1
Event Seq # Event Group Code Subject Modifier Personnel Cause/Factor
3 1 OBJECT TREE(S)




AIRCRAFT 1 PRELIMINARY REPORT


On June 21, 2000, about 1345 Alaska daylight time, an experimental Blanc Glastar airplane, N2623B, sustained substantial damage when it collided with trees while maneuvering about 10 miles northeast of Northway, Alaska, at 63 degrees, 02.4 minutes north latitude, 141 degrees, 40.1 minutes west longtitude. The commercial pilot and sole passenger sustained minor injuries. The personal flight was conducted under 14 CFR Part 91, and departed Whitehorse International Airport, Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, Canada, about 1100, for Northway. En route to Northway, the flight landed at Beaver Creek, Canada. The flight departed Beaver Creek about 1245 for Northway. Beaver Creek does not fuel facilities. The pilot did not hold an instrument rating. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at both the accident site, and Northway, at the time of the accident. A VFR flight plan was filed. The pilot contacted the FAA Northway Flight Service Station (FSS) about 1331, and reported he was 18 miles from Northway, on top of an overcast, and low on fuel. He estimated he had about four gallons of fuel. The FSS specialist on duty attempted to provide Direction Finding (DF) headings to the pilot, until the time that radio contact was lost. While communicating with the pilot, the FSS specialist told him that Beaver Creek was 45 miles to his southeast, and that the weather at Beaver Creek was reported to be VFR. The pilot replied he did not have enough fuel to return to Beaver Creek. According to an FAA operations inspector who interviewed the pilot and passenger on June 21, both occupants indicated that they were able to descend below the overcast through an opening in the clouds. They also said they were unable to comply with the recommended headings provided to them by the FSS specialist due to the clouds and visibility. They said they descended to the level of the trees due to lowering ceilings, rain, and visibility, and finally contacted trees. The pilot received a pilot weather briefing in person from NavCanada prior to the departure from Whitehorse. The Terminal Forecast for Northway included: 6 miles visibility, scattered clouds at 2,500 feet, and overcast clouds at 5,000 feet, with rain showers. Temporary conditions were forecast of 2,500 feet broken clouds, and light rain showers. This forecast was amended at 1100 to 6 miles visibility, with overcast ceilings at 1,400 feet. The actual weather at Northway at the time of the accident was visibility 1 1/2 miles in light rain, 1,000 feet broken, 1,300 feet overcast, with ceilings between 700 and 1,300 feet. The pilot did not return either of the two NTSB Pilot/Operator reports which were sent to him.

AIRCRAFT 1 FINAL REPORT


The pilot, who did not hold an instrument rating, received a weather brief prior to departure. The weather was forecast to be VFR along the route of flight. The pilot made an en route stop 60 miles short of the final destination, at an airport without available fuel. About 45 minutes after departing the en route stop, the pilot contacted the FAA Flight Service Station (FSS) and reported he was 18 miles from the destination, on top of an overcast, and low on fuel. The FSS specialist on duty attempted to provide Direction Finding (DF) headings to the pilot, until the time that radio contact was lost. While communicating with the pilot, the FSS specialist told him that his en route departure airport was 45 miles to his southeast, and that the weather was reported to be VFR. The pilot replied he did not have enough fuel to return. Both occupants indicated that they were able to descend below the overcast through an opening in the clouds. They also said they were unable to comply with the recommended headings provided to them by the FSS specialist due to the clouds and visibility. They said they descended to the level of the trees due to lowering ceilings, rain, and visibility, and finally contacted trees. Instrument meteorological conditions prevailed at the accident site, and at the intended destination.

AIRCRAFT 1 CAUSE REPORT


The pilot's continued flight into known adverse weather. A factor associated with the accident were low clouds.


END REPORT